Monday, May 21, 2018

Hamamatsu Sensors in Automotive Applications

Hamamatsu publishes a nice article "Photonics for advanced car technologies" showing many applications for its light sensors:

Samsung Presentation

Samsung System LSI Investor Presentation dated by April 30, 2018 shows the company success in image sensor business:

  • 1/3 Global Smartphones used ISOCELL image sensors
  • 4.6 out of 10 Chinese smartphones use ISOCELL sensors
  • 28nm image sensor process

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Anafocus Keynote at EI 2018

Electronic Imaging Symposium publishes a keynote "Sub-Electron Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors: Large Format, Fast, 0.5e-rms CIS with Oversampled 2‐Stage ADCs" by J. A. Segovia, F. Medeiro, A. Gonzales, A. Vellegas, and A. Rodriguez-Vazquez, Teledyne-Anafocus and Universidad de Sevilla.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Omnivision Keynote at EI 2018

Electronic Imaging publishes Omnivision keynote presentation "Automotive Image Sensors" by Boyd Fowler and Johannes Solhusvik. The presentation covers many areas from HDR to LiDARs:

Friday, May 18, 2018

Imec and Holst Centre Unveil Organic Fingerprint Sensor

Imec: Holst Centre, a joint initiative of imec and TNO, have demonstrated a new class of flexible, large-area sensor technology for detecting finger- and palmprints. At less than 0.2 mm thick, the new sensors can be embedded into objects such as mobile phones and door handles to create “invisible” yet secure access control systems that can tell if the print is from a living person rather than a phantom or counterfeit.

Two demonstrators are shown: Measuring 6 x 8 cm, a 200-ppi demonstrator is large enough for 4-finger scanners that are currently used by border control authorities and delivers sufficient image quality for basic identification applications. Meanwhile, a slightly smaller 500-ppi demonstrator offer even higher image quality, compatible with FBI standards and enough for law enforcement agencies to visualize minutia and pores for more robust identification.

As with Holst Centre’s earlier flexible X-ray detectors, the fingerprint sensors combine an organic PD frontplane, an oxide TFT backplane, and a thin-film barrier for protection against the environment. All three technological elements have been or are being transferred to industry for scale-up and commercialization. The sensors read the finger- or palm print by detecting visible light (400 to 700 nm) reflected from the surface of the skin. However, they can also detect light that penetrates someway into the skin before being reflected. This allows them to sense a heartbeat from changes in the capillaries within the hand, and thus verify that the print comes from a live person.

By using different PD materials, the sensors’ band can be extended to other wavelengths such as NIR. This could enable new identification verification modes based on, for example, the pattern of veins in a hand, which is believed to be even more specific to an individual than a fingerprint.

The flexible fingerprint sensor demonstrator shows the versatility and maturity of the flexible electronics technologies that Holst Centre is developing. With the underlying technology already in use in the flat-panel industry, there is a fast route to manufacturing and we are looking for industrial partners to take that step,” says Hylke Akkerman, Program Manager at Holst Centre.

ST Focuses on 3D Imaging

ST Micro 2018 Capital Markets Day was used to present the company focus on all types of 3D imaging: SPAD-based FlightSense, structured light (probably Apple Face ID IR sensor), and also indirect ToF:

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Machine Learning to Reduce High-ISO Noise

MSN, DPReview: Machine learning is often presented as a tool to improve high-ISO. Intel and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champlain are to present their AI algorithm in June:

"The Intel and UIUC team claims the algorithm can now amplify low-light images the equivalent of up to 300 times the exposure, without the same noise and discoloration that programs like Photoshop might introduce or having to take two separate images."



Imaging Resource publishes an interview with Sony managers called "A.I. is the future of mirrorless cameras:"

"That kind of technology is improving very fast. For example, our current processor has some general computing unit, but maybe in the next generation, the general computing CPU should become more designed for AI."

In a half-year old video, Sony Teruo Hirayama and Sony’s strategic advisor also the director of the MIT Media Lab, Joichi Ito discuss how image sensors and AI will combine to enhance human capabilities and open up new possibilities in the future:

Omron MEMS Thermal Sensor

Omron publishes a video demoing its low-resolution thermopile sensor:

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Framos Offers Sony SLVS-EC RX as FPGA IP

Framos SLVS-EC RX IP Core shortens design time with the latest generation of Sony image sensors. The SLVS-EC interface (Scalable Low-Voltage Signaling with Embedded Clock) has up to 8 lanes and 2.376 Gbps throughput per lane. When compared to Sony’s 2nd-generation CMOS image sensors with S-LVDS interfaces, the SLVS-EC interface doubles the overall output speed to 19 Gbps. SLVS-EC has more than three times higher bandwidth per lane.


Thanks to RP for the link!

Industry is Watching Market Response on Huawei Triple Camera

Digitimes: If Huawei is doing well with its P20 Pro smartphone with triple camera, other smartphone makers like Xiaomi, Oppo, Vivo, Lenovo, Asustek, HTC, and Sony are likely to come with similar solutions too, according to Digitimes sources. Huawei reportedly plans to extend its triple-lens cameras to its other high-end smartphone models.